Fleets : Fleets

What’s better than one vehicle running on CNG? Dozens, hundreds or thousands of them!

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Compressed natural gas (CNG) can fuel everything from vans and shuttles to transit buses, school buses and semitrucks. In fact, CNG-powered vans and shuttles are already in use in major cities and airports, saving money on fuel and reducing emission levels. Since CNG is a cleaner fuel than diesel or gasoline, engine wear is also reduced, allowing a vehicle to last longer.

With the same power as gasoline or diesel fuel, CNG can also be used in transit buses, semitrucks, school buses, waste disposal trucks and delivery vehicles. Currently, one of every five new transit buses in America is fueled by natural gas, and a natural gas-powered school bus can displace 1,400 gallons of diesel fuel per year. Currently, there are more than 2,500 CNG buses in school districts across the country.

Commercial vehicles travel a significantly greater number of miles per year than private vehicles, which average 10,000 to 15,000 miles per year.

Compact car: 23,148
Intermediate (midsize) car: 23,412
Light trucks: 28,020
Minivans: 27,852
SUVs: 22,968
Full-size vans: 25,212

SOURCE: Automotive Fleet Factbook

Medium Duty Vehicles

CNG powered vans and shuttles are already in use in major cities and airports, saving money on fuel and reducing emission levels. Since CNG is a cleaner fuel than diesel or gasoline, engine wear is also reduced, allowing a vehicle to last longer.

Vans and Shuttles

The use of natural gas-powered vans and shuttles is increasing in U.S. airports. Current applications are available for almost all models of domestic light- and medium-duty vans and shuttles.

By using natural gas, businesses can save money on fuel and pass the savings on to their customers.

This economic advantage demonstrates how natural gas shuttles are an opportunity for Americans to use a clean, abundant and affordable fuel.

Heavy Duty Vehicles

Fleet vehicles of cities and major corporations have found the smart way to save money on fuel costs and reduce emissions is through CNG. With the same power as gasoline or diesel fuel, CNG can be used in transit buses, semitrucks, school buses, waste disposal trucks and delivery vehicles.

Transit Buses

Currently, one of every five new transit buses in America is fueled by natural gas. As more American businesses become aware of the many benefits of using natural gas in its transit fleets, this number will certainly improve.

Cities such as Los Angeles, New York City, Phoenix, Fort Worth, Dallas, San Francisco, San Diego, Denver, Atlanta, Washington, D.C., have natural gas transit bus fleets.

Major manufacturers already produce natural gas-powered transit buses and can scale up even further with increased demand.

By consuming large volumes of fuel each year and emitting large amounts of exhaust, transit buses are one of the best ways to save municipal expenditures on fuel and improve city air quality.

Encourage your local municipal leaders and transit associations to buy and utilize natural gas buses.

School Buses

As our nation’s school districts urgently look for ways to meet budget constraints (given the high prices for diesel and gasoline) and stricter emissions regulations for heavy vehicles, administrators have been looking more and more to CNG vehicles. A natural gas-powered school bus can displace 1,400 gallons of diesel fuel per year.

Source: U.S. Dept. of Energy

CNG buses emit far fewer pollutants, such as soot (PM) and nitrogen dioxide (NOx), than older diesel engine buses (model 2006 and earlier) and significantly less NOx emissions than new diesel engine buses.

Source: UCS report, School Bus Pollution Report Card 2006: Grading the States, May 2006

Currently, there are more than 2,500 CNG buses in school districts across the country. Mansfield, Texas, is one such district where yellow buses have gone green.

Contact your Clean Cities Coordinator or school district and urge the superintendents and board members to change to CNG buses as soon as possible.

Semitrucks

One of the many answers to a clean and domestic energy future lies within the heavy-duty transportation sector.

Semitrucks are one of the largest consumers of foreign oil in the United States. As our country and economy depend on these trucks for daily deliveries of goods and services, fueling them with natural gas could reduce their emissions without sacrificing engine power.

Major manufacturers such as Kenworth and Sterling offer natural gas-powered trucks today and other manufacturers are planning to follow their lead. Using mostly liquefied natural gas (LNG), these massive vehicles operate with the same horsepower and performance as their diesel counterparts.

The LNG used in these vehicles comes from the liquefication of domestic natural gas. Cleaner for the environment, these LNG big rigs also save on fuel costs, which can only improve the economics of U.S. transportation.

A shining example of the many benefits of natural gas vehicles in this sector can be seen at the Port of Los Angeles. Learn more about it here.

Encouraging your legislative leaders to support the use of natural gas in the heavy-duty transportation sector can lead to a cleaner environment and increased energy independence.

Refuse Vehicles

Compressed natural gas is also popular among fleet operators, who point to lower operating and life-cycle costs, as well as reduced air pollution. CNG vehicles are being used in many fleet applications: airports, delivery services, long-haul trucks, parks, police and traffic enforcement, refuse haulers, buses (school, shuttle and transit) and taxis.

Like school buses, there are several factors that make fleet vehicles a great fit for CNG. They are typically high mileage vehicles, so the fuel savings from CNG vs. gasoline is substantial over the life of a vehicle. Plus, the central location of fleets mean they can locate near refueling stations or house their own facility.

Contact your local Clean Cities Coordinator and encourage their advocacy of CNG vehicles for fleet vehicles, shuttles, buses and taxis.


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